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November 28, 2008

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The slippage here has been gradual enough for few to really notice until this last year. Now, anyone who knows anything is talking about it. Much of it is economic but there's also a palpable sense that there's no real destiny left except the apocalyptic kind. You'd have to be a Goldwater Institute blowhard to see real estate as an unredeemed promised land.

That said, denialism has become Arizona's political religion. Since political extremists control the conversation here, the citizens can take comfort in knowing global warming isn't real, that low taxes fix everything, and that Jesus was the first Republican.

We were Palinized before anyone had heard of the Alaskan Ditz. Understandably, The Arizona Republic is catering to the median level of information (ultra-low) but most people regard it as suspiciously liberal anyway. We'll continue to argue about weirdnesses and anomalies but it won't matter in the long run. Arizona is on fire but the metaphor has become alarmingly literal.

"...and the remnants of city-provided benches on their front slabs."

Ooh, good snark.

I too think that those pie-in-sky boondoggles are, well, boondoggles - luckily (?) the economy is in such a state that I doubt if any will ultimately be tried anyway in the long run.

Just focusing on being real friendly to my neighbors at this point. And there are a lot of people that willfully will not see this coming, and they're going to need some help in coping...

You would of hit the roof if you had watched Channel 12's Faceoff on Sunday morning. There was the shrill shill for the Goldwater Institute, a finance professor from ASU (recently transplanted from Ohio), and a poor Phoenix councilman. The councilman was pushing diversity and infrastructure projects to get the economy going, but the shill and the prof shot him down.

The usual BS from the Goldwater Insti flack (lower taxes, slash budgets and government, and let the private sector invest in infrastructure and then charge us for it -- I had to wonder were these floundering bankrupt contractors and investment houses would come up with the cash to do this), but the prof basically shot down the diversity issue (hey it didn't work in derelict Ohio, so it won't work anywhere, and anyway the market should decide) AND promoted propping up the housing market so the AZ economy would rebound (at least he is smart enough to recognize the only game left in town).

It's so sad and frustrating. The only thing our politicians will spend money on are police and boondoggles. It will only get worse once Napolitano leaves.

Is Arizona a leading indicator of what is happening in our country as a whole: sick economic fundamentals, disengaged and selfish elites hiding in their walled compounds, an underclass swollen by immigration non-policies designed to benefit low-wage employers and the National Council of La Raza. And now our president joins John McCain in calling for "comprehensive immigration reform" that would go far beyond legalization of 12 million. CIR would ensure that farms and restaurants and roofers have all the cheap labor they want. It would accelerate the importation not only of Mexico's poor but also of Mexico's social structure. Meanwhile, the Club for Growth smiles in phony benevolence while the glowering McCain, admonishing us to embrace all God's children, divides his Arizona quality time between the Phoenix high-rise condo and the compound south of Sedona.

Seriously? Nearly every problem you describe is an issue for any major city. The only one that is moderately unique to Phoenix is lack of water, but most cities struggle there as well.

Hi! as an ex-resident of Phoenix, I was fascinated by your article. even though now days, my only visits to Arizona is to Sun city, where my grandma lives, I still remember my days in Pheonix. It is very important to keep people aware and alert to the effects of global warming on our beloved places.

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